#253 sunday preaching on shattered dream

Last Sunday at St Andrews Cathedral 5pm service, the preacher asked, “What is the opposite of trust?” “I hope you will not answer ‘distrust’.” Was he condescending? Was he treating his congregation like his Sunday School kids?

Guess his answer? “Fear.” He was quite smug about his answer!

It’s a wonder why Christians do not fear God! Fear in this context has negative connotation. Often the word ‘fear’ used with God implies ‘reverence’.  If the opposite of trust is fear then, Christians rightly can question God and disbelieve all that written in the Bible. (I’m sure he will argue and excuse his way out on this.)

The preacher could have used ‘afraid of tomorrow; disquiet; anxiety; and so on…’ 

I went away wondering…what is the role of the pastor? His role is to bury, to marry, to visit the sick and to baptise. Does this mean he hasn’t the time to pray through when he was preparing his sermons?

Yesteryears, a pastor was able to take care of one congregation. Today a pastor has many paid helpers and there are more pastors to the number of congregations at St Andrews Cathedral.

There is the constant complaint that pastors have a lot to do. Does this mean he can be excused for his ill-chosen words? Can he be excused for his wooly sermons? He is called to preach God’s Word — a sermon at Sunday service is a fresh reminder for the congregation to lean on God throughout the week. Can the congregation members recall that he preached throughout the week?

He claimed he had shattered dreams but… The truth is shattered dream is relative in understanding as the intensity of one’s shattered dream differs from another…

Was he able to say he went through the same experiences that Job in the Old Testament went through? He made no direction to Job’s predicament at all.

What was he taught in homiletics during his theological or bible school days?

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